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Scimitar-horned Oryx (Oryx dammah)_2


I see a lot of oryx because I visit a lot of zoos. I have to remind myself that they extinct in the wild. Today, according to the IUCN red list, there are:


* 130 in captivity in Bou Hedma, Tunisia

* 25 in Sidi-Toui, Tunisia

* 12 in Oued Dekouk, Tunisia

* 240 in Souss-Massa, Morocco

* 18 in Guembeul, Senegal

* 12 in Ferlo, Senegal


There are also some recovery populations at the San Diego Zoo and the Phoenix Zoo.


There are also numerous ranches in Texas you can go to kill and eat them.


Yeah.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Speckled Mousebird (Colius striatus)_3


This game of tic-tac-toe is going to take forever.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Safari Park_7


I am certain that, even in infrared, coots are terrible parents.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Safari Park_10


In infrared, flamingos look like sinister mob groups working to fix the next election and/or boxing match.


In reality, flamingos actually do work to fix elections and sporting events. Their pinkness is a form of protective colouration, ’cause no one expects the pink mafia.


Edit: After googling, I now know that “pink mafia” is a sexist and/or homophobic term. This is another way that you can tell that flamingos are evil, as they deflect attention away from them towards disadvantaged groups.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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San Clemente Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus mearnsi)_6


Shrikes are evolution in action. According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (or “CLoO!” as probably no one calls it), “[The shrike] is a songbird with a raptor’s habits”. Basically, it likes to eat meat, but it doesn’t have talons, so it swoops down to grab a little lizard or something, then skewers it on things like barbed wire, cactus thorns, etc so it can eat it without holding on to its prey.


I may never get a photo of one hunting, but I am glad to have gotten a photo this good of one sitting.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Southern White Rhinoceros


You’d lie down too if you had to nurse someone with a horn right above his mouth.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Superb Bird-of-paradise (Lophorina superba)


OK, fine. Here’s the male, being superb and hiding from the camera a bit.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Superb Bird-of-paradise (Lophorina superba)_11


This is a superb bird-of-paradise pointing out that it’s unrealistic to expect to be superb all the time.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Southern White Rhinoceros


When not otherwise occupied, southern white rhinos entertain the rest of the animals by letting them play shadow puppets.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Wattled Crane (Bugeranus carunculatus)_33


Those little things hangin’ there be the wattles.


They’re important ’cause you can’t wattle without them.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Southern White Rhinoceros


When they’re young, rhinos can levitate.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Papuan Hornbill (Rhyticeros plicatus)_2


The first Papuan hornbills seen between 1966 and 1969 had smooth beaks. It wasn’t until the 1979 that we saw the ridges for the first time.


There are many theories as to why this is the case.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Ridgway's Rail (Rallus obsoletus)


This is a bad photo of a Ridgway Rail. It is, however, perhaps the best photo I’ll ever get as their population declined by 51% between 2007 and 2008.


The question I ask myself a lot though, is “does it really matter?” I mean, there are lots of rails. I’ll be posting about a Guam rail in a few weeks or so. The Guam rail is interesting because it’s story is similar to the Wake Island rail. This was a bird that died out sometime between 1942 and 1945. Why? Well, there was a war on, there was an island and some abandoned soldiers. Basically, it was eaten to extinction … by humans … in living memory.


This is the pattern we’re seeing. On islands, in estuaries, and on mountaintops (or hilltops), animals are restricted in terms of both movement and resources. If something happens to the environment, then they run out escape room and, eventually, die out. When soldiers were stations on Wake Island, they liked the little birds, until they ran out of things to eat. This Ridgeway Rail lives in a very small area that is being developed and, where buildings are built, nests can’t be.


Today, we are seeing a massive extinction rate on these sorts of islands. It makes sense. Not only are humans building into the places that these animals live, but the creatures we bring with us, like rats, cats, and dogs, move into the remaining area and start eating eggs and whatever else they can get ahold of.


The problem is that we are also making new islands. As cities expand, and roads are constructed, we are basically carving up the remaining surface of the planet into a whole lot of little islands. Some animals don’t care. Birds can fly over highways. Deer can cross them. But some can’t. Jaguars won’t cross large roads because it means leaving their woodland, where they are safe. Small butterflies won’t fly across roads because they can eaten by birds if they’re in the open that much. Larger mostly-flightless birds won’t leave their little area because there’s guarantee of what they’ll find.


So as their living space shrinks, the genetics of each population start to homogenize. Thus, in addition to indirect threats like habitat loss/degradation and direct threats like invasive species, there is an internal threat from the species itself. If you cut any species into enough pockets (or islands) it’s not going to survive. We’re seeing this today with the rails. They live on islands and along coasts, so they’re bound to the land. They don’t really fly, so the populations stay static and vulnerable.


So really, we run the risk of losing the Ridgway’s rail just like we lost the Wake Island rail (1940’s), the Chatham rail (1900), the Hawkin’s rail (1900), both species of red rail (mid 18th century), the ascension crake (late 17th century), the Saint Helena swamphen (16th century), the Antillean cave rail, Haitian cave rail, and Cuban cave rail (all in human pre-history).


Will the world survive the loss of the Ridgeway rail or the Guam rail? Yes. They are a niche species and something will come along to fill that niche. However, I think the real question is, how many more species do we have to lose before we hit that one that can’t be replaced, and what do we do then?




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Indian Rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis)_1


For a creature as armored as this one is, it’s surprising how quickly they react when you touch them.


The same is true for turtles.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Blue-billed Curassow (Crax alberti)_9


This bird lives only in small regions in Columbia and at the bird breeding center. As with many species, it’s greatest threat is habitat destruction. Unlike most species, it’s habitat is under threat due to marijuana plantations.


So, if you care about endangered species, you should also be in favor of decriminalizing pot and buying local, I guess.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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Milky Eagle Owl (Bubo lacteus)_15


Pondering the fact that it would be much more realistic for young Bruce Wayne to fall down a hole and discover a small family of raccoons.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus)_15


All the roses in the garden, they bow and ask for pardon, for while all could match the beauty of the Viscountess of Ardnamurchan, she was dangerous when angered.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.

Park

Jul. 13th, 2016 02:01 pm
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Park_5


Another view of the park, this time with the balloon ride in progress.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
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California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus)_33


“Give us the Shard and you can go free.”




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.

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